Contact Information 

 

49 Terrace Street

Sydney, Nova Scotia

B1P 2L4

Phone(902) 562-5464

Fax(902) 564-4472

E-Mail:

 sydacademy@gnspes.ca

 

 


Guidance Office:

 

Phone:  (902) 562-7047

Fax: (902) 562-3747

 

More Contact Info

Barry Halloran

Global History 12

Communication Plan

Mr. Barry Halloran

Room 202

Sydney Academy

Course Outline

Global History is a study of world history from 1945 to the present. The course is broken down into five separate units, each revolving around the central question, “How did the world arrive at its current state at the close of the 20th century?” The units are arranged as follows:

Unit 1: Heirs of War

Unit 2: North South

Unit 3: The Pursuit of Justice

Unit 4: Societal and Technological Change

Unit 5: Acknowledging Global Interdependence: The Legacy of the 20th Century.

 

Aims and Objectives

Each unit has a series of questions that range from basic questions that involve looking up people and dates to high level critical thinking questions that allow students to examine a topic from several different points of view. Each unit also contains two case studies which examine the unit topic in detail. For example the unit Heirs of War has two case studies that deal with the Berlin Crisis, and the Cuban Missile Crisis. Each case study has a series of questions that must be completed, as well as other questions that deal with each unit in the text.

 

Student Assessment and Attendance

Attendance is very important in this course which is made up of 110 hours of classroom instruction. Any student who misses habitually will not meet the outcomes of this course and will not complete it successfully as a consequence. It is essential that students attend every class as a fair amount of ground will be covered each day. Unless there are severe extenuating circumstances, students are expected to be present for this class. Habitual tardiness will not be tolerated as the classroom door will be locked after the last bell rings.

         

Discipline

It is assumed that students will conduct themselves accordingly in class. As Global History is a Grade 12 course, behavior should hopefully not be a problem. Any problems regarding discipline or behavior will be referred to the main office if they become chronic. It is implicitly understood that all students are in class to learn. Any disruptions of this process will be dealt with immediately as per our school standards regarding Responsible Behaviors in Learning. All papers, essays, and homework assignments must be passed in on time. Late assignments will not be accepted. Such work can be dropped off at the main office on or before the due date by parents, guardians, or classmates. Missed tests and assignments that have a legitimate excuse may be prorated.

 

Marking Schemata

The marking scheme of this course will be set up as follows:

40%: Tests, Essays, Assignments, Homework, Short Papers, Major Projects.

30%: Final Exam

15%: Mid-term Examinations

15%: Major research paper

 

As part of this course there is a 2500 word research essay which is worth 15% of the total mark of 100 points. The essay can be related to any topic of interest a student may have regarding any of the course material. This essay will be assigned in early September and is expected to be passed in by the beginning of January 2016.

 

Communications

Communications with parents or guardians can be made through the regular channels such as parent teacher meetings if it is a regular issue regarding marks or attendance. If further communication is required, I can be contacted at Sydney Academy at 562-5464 to arrange a meeting on an issue that may be of a more urgent concern. Homework will be posted on the Homework Hotline which can be accessed through the school website at any time.

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Theory of Knowledge

Communication Plan

Barry Halloran

Sydney Academy

Room 202

The Theory of Knowledge course is central to the educational philosophy of the International Baccalaureate Program. It challenges students to reflect critically on diverse ways of knowing, areas of knowledge, and to consider the role knowledge plays in a global society. It encourages students to become aware of the complexity of knowledge, and to recognize the need to act responsibly in an increasingly interconnected world.

 As a thoughtful and purposeful inquiry into different ways of knowing, and into different kinds of knowledge, this course is composed almost entirely of questions. The most central of these questions is “How do I, or how do we know that a given assertion is true, or a given judgment is well grounded?” Assertions or judgments of this sort are termed “knowledge claims”, while the difficulties that arise in addressing these questions are broad areas known as the “problems of knowledge”. The course entails the application of this central question to many different yet interrelated topics.

Questions are the very essence of this course, both ageless questions on which thinkers have been reflecting for centuries, and new ones that are often challenging accepted belief, which are posed by contemporary life. Engaging with students in a critical examination of knowledge, this course will foster an appreciation of the quest for knowledge, in particular its importance, complexities, and its human implications. It is the prime objective of this course to bring alive the central questions contained in the course guide for a new generation of knowers, and to encourage them to gather and apply their own knowledge with greater awareness and responsibility.

The questions are grouped into four broad categories: Knower and Knowing, Ways of Knowledge, Areas of Knowledge, and Linking Questions. These categories and the elements which they encompass are represented graphically in a diagram in which the knowers, the individual or community, are at the center. The grouping of questions, both into the broad categories and within each subsection, is for the purpose of conceptual clarity.

 Aims:

The aim of the Theory of Knowledge course is to engage students in reflection on, and in questioning of, the bases of knowledge so they:

  1. Develop an understanding of why critically examining knowledge claims is important.
  2. Develop a critical capacity to evaluate beliefs and knowledge claims and make interdisciplinary connections.
  3. Become aware of the interpretive nature of knowledge including personal and ideological biases.
  4. Consider that knowledge may place responsibilities on the knower.
  5. Understand the strengths and limitations of individual or cultural perspectives.
  6. Develop a concern for rigor in formulating knowledge claims, and intellectual honesty.

 Objectives:

Having followed the Theory of Knowledge course, candidates should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the strengths and limitations of the various Ways of Knowing, and the methods used in different Areas of Knowledge.
  2. Demonstrate a capacity to reason critically.
  3. Make connections between and across Ways of Knowing, and Areas of Knowledge.
  4. Make connections between personal experience, and different Ways of Knowing and Areas of Knowledge.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of knowledge at work in the world.
  6. Identify values underlying judgments, and knowledge claims pertinent to local and global issues.
  7. Demonstrate an understanding that personal views, judgments and beliefs may influence knowledge claims.
  8. Use oral and written language to formulate and communicate ideas clearly.

 Student Assessment:

Diploma students will be assessed on a major compulsory essay worth 40% of their total mark. There will also be a compulsory class presentation valued at 20% of the term. Both of these assignments will be due in by February of 2016. The remaining 40% will be made up of marks from tests, essays, presentations, and other methods of evaluation.

The mark for non-diploma students will be calculated from five major essays, a class presentation, short essays, and tests. This course revolves around academic discussion and intellectual curiosity, so classroom participation is essential! Failure to participate will have a negative effect on expectations!

Students in this course are also expected to attend. Unless there are severe extenuating circumstances, students are expected to be present for this class. All papers and assignments should be passed in on or before the due date. Late assignments will not be accepted. You can have a parent, guardian, or classmate pass in an assignment by bringing it to the main office. Missed tests and assignments that have a legitimate excuse may be prorated.

 Communication:

Communications with parents or guardians can be made through the usual channels such as parent teacher meetings. If further communication is required, such as a telephone call or personal meeting, I can be contacted through the main office at 562-5464. Homework and assignments will also be placed on the Sydney Academy Homework Hotline which can be accessed through the school website www.sacademy.cbv.ns.ca.

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Grade Nine Pre I.B. Social Studies

Communication Plan

Mr. B. Halloran

Room 202

Sydney Academy

Introduction

This course is an introduction to the International Baccalaureate Program and the expectations that are part of this program. The course will follow the traditional Grade Nine Social Studies curriculum, but will go into much greater detail regarding some areas like economics, geography, and history. The course concentrates mainly on Atlantic Canada as a region from a geographical, economic, social, historical, and political perspective. Also incorporated within the course are several key concepts such as:

  • Change
  • Global Interactions
  • Systems
  • Time, Place, and Space

 Part of this course involves designing, developing, and writing a research essay that could include topics such as:

  • Entrepreneurship, business, and economic issues
  • Propaganda, persuasion, and the impact of contemporary social and mass media
  • Stereotypes, identity, values, and cultural adaptation
  • Local and global challenges in human and natural geography
  • The historical development and impact of a significant person, group, idea, event, or technology

This is a central part of the course and is intended to allow students to develop the research and writing skills that will be essential to be successful in the I.B. program. This assignment will be on going throughout the year with the finished essay being due during the second week of May, 2016.

 

Aims and Objectives

In this course, many different topics will be covered such as: Economics, Sociology, Geography, History, etc. The topics are very diverse, but they deal mainly with Atlantic Canada and its uniqueness with respect to the rest of Canada. Present day examples will be used in the classroom to help put these diverse topics into perspective. This will consist of current books, newspaper articles, websites, and documentary footage.

This course is designed to help students think critically about the importance of where we live, our economic system, and the importance of our culture and society and how it relates to Canada and the world as a whole. It is expected that after taking this course students will be able to think critically about economics, economic systems in general, and geography, as well as to have an acute understanding of the role government plays in our daily lives.

 

Evaluation

In addition to the major research essay, students will also be expected to write short essays complete homework assignments, and write unit tests. The marking schemata will include the following:

  • Major research essay: 15%
  • Mid-term examination: 15%
  • Final examination: 30%
  • Tests, essays, homework assignments: 40%

It is essential that students attend every class as a fair amount of ground will be covered each day. Students in this course are not only expected to attend, but they must be prompt. After arriving late three times, the student or students will not be admitted into the classroom, and asked to see one of the school administrators in the main office.

Unless there are severe extenuating circumstances, students are to be present for this class. All papers and assignments should be passed in on or before the due date. Late assignments will not be accepted. You can have a parent, guardian, or classmate pass in an assignment by bringing it to the main office. Students must be present for in-class assignments. Missed tests and assignments that have a legitimate excuse may be prorated at the discretion of the teacher.

 

Discipline

Students in class will be expected to treat one another and their teacher with respect at all times. Any type of behaviour that interferes with the educational experience of other students in the class will be dealt with immediately. If the behaviour continues, more drastic measures may be applied to deal with it.

 

Communication

Communications with parents or guardians can be made through the usual channels such as parent teacher meetings. If further communication is required, such as a telephone call or personal meeting, I can be contacted through the main office at 562-5464. Homework and assignments will be placed on the Sydney Academy Homework Hotline which can be accessed through the school website www.sacademy.cbv.ns.ca.

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Economics 11

Communication Plan

Mr. B. Halloran

Room 202

Sydney Academy

 

Economics is a dynamic social science, which deals mainly about the concept of scarcity and the problems of resource allocation. This course is fairly comprehensive, and is interrelated with other disciplines such as History, Political Science, Psychology, Mathematics, Sociology, and issues of Technology.

 

 Aims and Objectives

In this course, many different topics will be covered such as: Scarcity, Wants, Productive Resources, Production Possibilities, Supply and Demand, Elasticity, Entrepreneurship, Finance, Business Organizations, etc. The topics are very diverse, but they deal mainly with Microeconomic theory. Present day examples will be used in the classroom to help put these economic theories into perspective. This will consist of current newspaper articles, websites, and documentary footage.

 

This course is designed to help students think critically about the importance of economics, and the importance of our economic system to our culture and society. Several different economic systems around the world will be examined, and comparison made with how they function as compared to our current economic system. It is expected that after taking this course students will be able to think critically about economics, economic systems in general, as well as have an acute understanding of the role government plays in our economic system.

 

Student Assessment

It is essential that students attend every class as a fair amount of ground will be covered each day. Students in this course are also expected to attend. Unless there are severe extenuating circumstances, students are expected to be present for this class. All papers and assignments should be passed in on or before the due date. Late assignments will not be accepted. You can have a parent, guardian, or classmate pass in an assignment by bringing it to the main office. Missed tests and assignments that have a legitimate excuse will be prorated.

The marking scheme of this course will be as follows:

40%: Test, Essays, Assignments, Homework, Short Papers.

30%: Final Exam

15%: Mid-Term Examination

15%: Research Essay

 

Discipline

Students in class will be expected to treat one another and their teacher with respect at all times. Any type of behavior that interferes with the educational experience of other students in the class will be dealt with immediately. If the behavior continues, more drastic measures may be applied to deal with it.

 

 Communication

Communications with parents or guardians can be made through the usual channels such as parent teacher meetings. If further communication is required, such as a telephone call or personal meeting, I can be contacted through the main office at 562-5464. Homework and assignments will be placed on the Sydney Academy Homework Hotline which can be accessed through the school website www.sacademy.cbv.ns.ca.

____________________________________________________________

Economics 12

Communication Plan

Sydney Academy

Mr. B. Halloran

Room 202

 

Economics is a dynamic social science, which deals mainly about the concept of scarcity and the problems of resource allocation. This course is fairly comprehensive, and is interrelated with other disciplines such as History, Political Science, Psychology, Mathematics, Sociology, and issues of Technology.

 

Aims and Objectives

In this course, many different topics will be covered such as: Market Systems and how they work, Gross Domestic Product, Consumer Price Indexes, Inflation, Unemployment Rates, Productivity, Aggregate Demand, Fiscal Policy, Control of the Money Supply, International Trade, etc. The topics are very diverse, but they deal mainly with Macroeconomic theory. Present day examples will be used in the classroom to help put these economic theories into perspective. This will consist of current newspaper articles, websites, and documentary footage.

 

This course is designed to help students think critically about the importance of economics, and the importance of our economic system to our culture and society. Several different economic systems around the world will be examined, and comparison made with how they function as compared to our current economic system. It is expected that after taking this course students will be able to think critically about economics, economic systems in general, as well as have an acute understanding of the role government plays in our economic system.

 

Student Assessment and Attendance

Attendance is very important in this course which is made up of 110 hours of classroom instruction. Any student who misses habitually will not meet the outcomes of this course and will not complete it successfully as a consequence. It is essential that students attend every class as a fair amount of ground will be covered each day. Unless there are severe extenuating circumstances, students are expected to be present for this class. All papers and assignments should be passed in on or before the due date. Late assignments will not be accepted. You can have a parent, guardian, or classmate pass in an assignment by bringing it to the main office. Students must be present in class to complete in-class assignments. Missed tests and assignments that have a legitimate excuse may be prorated.

 

Students in class will be expected to treat one another and their teacher with respect at all times. Any type of behavior that interferes with the educational experience of other students in the class will be dealt with immediately. If the behavior continues, more drastic measures may be applied by the school administration to deal with it.

 

The marking scheme of this course will be as follows:

55%: Test, Essays, Assignments, Homework, Short Papers

30%: Final Exam

15%: Mid-Term Examination which will be split 50/50 for the November Progress Report.

 

Communication

Communications with parents or guardians can be made through the usual channels such as parent teacher meetings. If further communication is required, such as a telephone call or personal meeting, I can be contacted through the main office at 562-5464. Homework and assignments will also be placed on the Sydney Academy Homework Hotline which can be accessed through the school website www.sacademy.cbv.ns.ca.

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